Tag Archives: SQLPaaS

Azure Technical Fiction

Azure SQL PaaS version confusion

So, it seems that simply obtaining the version information for your SQL PaaS database server isn’t as straightforward as it seems, the official advice from Microsoft is that:

 

Azure SQL Database is always running on the latest stable version of SQL Server Database Engine and patched OS with 99.99% availability

 

{from https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/sql-database/sql-database-paas-index)

 

I was checking this yesterday (4th November 2019) and seeing as MS Ignite has just kicked off in Florida and that SQL Server 2019 is not yet generally available (announcement expected at Ignite) I was assuming that our SQL PaaS database servers would be running SQL Server 2017 patched to CU 17.

 

Off I go to SQL Management studio to verify, I connect to one of my SQL PaaS DB servers and I run:

 

@@version

 

The server happily responds with:

 

Microsoft SQL Azure (RTM) – 12.0.2000.8
Oct 12 2019 22:46:48
Copyright (C) 2019 Microsoft Corporation

 

Version 12.0.2000.8??? What on earth, that’s referring to SQL Server 2014 which was end of support literally a month or so ago.

Some quick research and it seems that the version reported using the @@version command isn’t correct. Next command to try:

 

SELECT SERVERPROPERTY(‘ProductVersion’);

 

Server response:

 

12.0.2000.8

 

Well that’s not right. Let’s try something else:

 

SELECT SERVERPROPERTY(‘ResourceVersion’);

 

Server response:

 

15.00.1900

 

Ahhhh that’s more like it, but what does version 15 correspond to? Well it seems it’s SQL Server 2019 – eh? How can that be if it’s not GA yet?

 

Well, it seems your SQL PaaS really is running on the latest, greatest release of SQL Server. Using the helpful info provided at https://sqlserverbuilds.blogspot.com/ it seems the .1900 refers to a very recent version of SQL Server 2019 which is probably an October 12th release as per the date given by @@version.

 

TLDR: Your SQL Server PaaS in Azure IS running the latest version of SQL, in fact currently one that isn’t available publicly. Wicked!

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